Restricted Funds

You may wish to support specific law-related causes that are meaningful to you. One excellent way to do so is to direct your charitable contribution to one or more Restricted Funds administered by The New York Bar Foundation. Gifts to The Foundation for Restricted Funds are used in support of programs relating to the special purpose of the fund. Each donor of a gift to a Restricted Fund will be acknowledged in The Foundation’s Annual Report. 

We welcome the establishment of new Restricted Funds within The Foundation in the name of an individual or entity to be used for particular law-related purposes. Restricted Funds are an ideal way to pay a lasting tribute to a loved one, friend or colleague. All Restricted Funds will be recognized in The Foundation’s Annual Report and the State Bar News and will include the name of the donor establishing the fund and the name and purpose of the fund. Please contact foundation@tnybf.org to request additional information or to arrange a meeting to discuss details.

You may contribute to any of the following Restricted Funds:



Mark Alcott headshotThe Mark H. Alcott Fund

Provides funding to support pro bono legal services for the poor.

This Fund was established in 2010 in honor of former New York State Bar Association President Mark H. Alcott, Esq, through an initiative spearheaded by the law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP of New York and Mark’s wife, Cantor Susan B. Alcott. The Fund serves as a tribute to Mr. Alcott for his years of dedicated and ongoing commitment to the legal profession.  

Mark Alcott has spent his professional career as a trial lawyer at Paul, Weiss focusing on commercial litigation. In addition to his substantial client responsibilities, he served for several years as partner in charge of the Paul, Weiss Public Matters Committee, which oversees the firm’s extensive pro bono and public service efforts.

He served as the 109th President of the New York State Bar Association during the 2006-2007 term of office. While State Bar president, he led the fight for independence and diversity of the bench and the bar and against discrimination in the profession. His many initiatives included proposals to reform judicial selection procedures, develop a new civil rights agenda, and enhance opportunities for lawyers in transition between positions, including those who temporarily leave the profession to care for children or other family members and those who leave involuntarily because of adverse economic conditions. He initiated and led the effort to end mandatory retirement policies in the profession, a proposal that won endorsement by the American Bar Association and led to significant favorable changes in this practice. He created the Empire State Counsel program that promotes free legal services for the poor and he advocated an extensive reform agenda.   To give to this fund, click here.  Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The Mark H. Alcott Fund.


Richard J. Bartlett  headshotThe Richard J. Bartlett Fund
Provides funding to improve legal services to the indigent.
This fund was established by The Foundation Board of Directors in 2004 in honor of Richard J. Bartlett of Glens Falls, who has dedicated a lifetime of service to the bar and the community. Currently with the law firm of Bartlett, Pontiff, Stewart & Rhodes PC, Glens Falls, Mr. Bartlett has filled the roles of teacher, judge, court administrator, lawmaker and practitioner. He has pursued all of these roles with a steadfast commitment to justice, enriching the law and the life of the various communities he has served.  To give to this fund, click here.
 Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The Richard J. Bartlett Fund.


The Commercial and Federal Litigation Section Minority Fellowship Fund

Provides funding for fellowships to minority students attending a law school in New York State to work in a litigation position in the public sector.

The fund has been named after the Commercial and Federal Litigation Section of the New York State Bar Association. The goal of the fellowship program is to increase the representation of lawyers and students from a diverse range of backgrounds in commercial litigation, and to provide students from a diverse range of backgrounds with an opportunity to experience litigation practice. The ultimate goal of the Fellowship is to create a network and forge relationships which will foster greater diversity among commercial and federal litigators throughout the State of New York. Through the fellowship, students will be provided a meaningful and appropriately supervised work experience.

The purpose of the Commercial and Federal Litigation Section is to improve the quality of representation of clients, provide a forum for the improvement of law and procedure in the areas of commercial and federal litigation, and enhance the administration of justice.


The Corporate Counsel Section Fellowship

The Corporate Counsel Section~The Fellowship was created as part of the Corporate Counsel Section’s commitment to diversity and in conjunction with the New York State Bar Association’s Diversity Challenge. The fellowship goal is twofold; to provide the selected organizations with the chance to have students from a diverse range of backgrounds provide assistance without cost and, to provide students from a diverse range of backgrounds with an opportunity to experience in-house legal practice.   To give to this fund click here.  Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The Corporate Counsel Section Fellowship Fund.


John R. Dunne headshotThe John R. Dunne Fund
Provides funding for legal services to families and children of indigent prisoners.
Established in 2003, this fund was established in honor of John R. Dunne, who has served as a legal scholar, activist, and former state Senator with a storied career as lawyer, statesman and politician. From 1990 to 1993 he was the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Justice and was a member of the New York State Senate for twenty-four years serving from 1966 to 1989. As a state senator, he served at various times as Deputy Majority Leader and chair of the judiciary, environmental protection, insurance, and prisons committees.

From 1956 to 1965 he was law secretary to a New York State Supreme Court Justice and headed the law department of the Nassau County Court. Throughout his local and state service, he actively practiced law on Long Island, as a partner in the national law firm of Rivkin, Radler, Dunne & Bayh. He was awarded both the Edmund Randolph and the John Marshal awards for distinguished service and received the New York State Bar Association’s highest tribute, the 2006 Gold Medal Award, in honor of his outstanding career contributions and efforts in furtherance of the legal system. He has previously served as Chair of the Fellows of The New York Bar Foundation and is currently Senior Counsel at Whiteman Osterman & Hanna LLP in Albany. The John R. Dunne Fund provides funding for legal services to families and children of indigent prisoners, continuing John Dunne’s dedication to this important cause.    To give to this fund, click here.
 Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The John R. Dunne Fund. 


Joel K. Asarch Section on Elder Law and Special Needs Scholarship

Provides funding for scholarships for students attending a law school in the State of New York who are participating in an Elder Law Clinic at the school.

The scholarship was established in 2009 with a gift from the New York State Bar Association’s Elder Law Section and renamed in 2013 in memory and honor of the esteemed Honorable Joel K. Asarch.  The purpose of the scholarship is to help create a network and cultivate relationships among lawyers practicing elder law and law students planning to practice elder law and to advance the practice of elder law among lawyers throughout the State of New York.

 One annual scholarship will be awarded to a second or third year student attending a law school in the State of New York who is participating in an Elder Law Clinic at the school. The section encourages law students, through an elder law clinic experience, to learn about important legislative developments, regulations, and case laws impacting the elderly and to provide representation to elderly clients struggling with a variety of legal issues and problems related to aging and incapacity.  

Through the scholarship, the section aspires to advance opportunities for the disabled by employing a preference for awarding the scholarship to a student who demonstrates a present and permanent physical or mental disability that substantially limits one or more of the major life activities of the individual. 

The Elder Law Section provides services and opportunities for involvement on issues relating to Elder Law for members of the New York State Bar Association.  Among its activities, the section presents educational  programs and publishes materials on practice, procedure and developments to enhance the competence and skill of lawyers who practice in this field and improve their ability to deliver the most efficient and highest quality of services to their clients; prepare studies, analyses and recommendations to seek improvement in the law and procedure relating to elder law; and undertake projects to increase the understanding of senior citizens, their families and the general public concerning legal issues affecting the elderly.


Joan L. Ellenbogen headshotThe Joan L. Ellenbogen Memorial Fellowship Fund

Provides funding for grant awards to New York nonprofit organizations for fellowships that will provide assistance in matters relating to matrimonial law.
Marcia C. Goldstein, New York, established this fund in 2009 in memory of her former law firm partner, Joan L. Ellenbogen. The fellowship is available to public service or other nonprofit organizations with the need for a fellow to assist with matters relating to matrimonial law. The goal of the fellowship is to encourage lawyers and students in the practice of matrimonial law so that individuals will have access to representation and a greater understanding of their rights in matters relating to matrimonial and family law in the State of New York.

Joan L. Ellenbogen practiced matrimonial and family law at the law firm, Ellenbogen & Goldstein, P.C., New York, from 1979 until her death in 2001. In 1980, she was the founding president of the Women’s Bar Association of the State of New York, a state-wide organization dedicated to the advancement of women in society and in the legal profession. She was the first woman Chair of the executive committee of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York. Additionally, Ms. Ellenbogen was a member of the First Department Disciplinary Committee and served on the Board of Trustees of the Legal Aid Society. She served on the executive committee of the Family Law Section of the New York State Bar Association, and in 2001 was the recipient of the Association’s prestigious Ruth G. Shapiro Award. A graduate of New York University School of Law, Ms. Ellenbogen was admitted to the New York Bar in 1965.   Click here for Fellowship grant guidelines.


Robert L. Haig headshotThe Robert L. Haig Fund

Supports innovations in the provision of cost-effective civil legal services for the indigent.

In June 2006, the Board of Directors of The New York Bar Foundation established the Robert L. Haig Fund in honor of Robert L. Haig, Esq. The members of The Foundation’s Board made personal contributions to this Fund as a tribute to Mr. Haig for his leadership, dedication, guidance and support during his three-year term as President of The Foundation. 

Robert Haig is a litigation partner with the law firm of Kelley Drye & Warren LLP in New York City. He is a former President of the New York County Lawyers’ Association and a former member of the New York State Bar Association’s Executive Committee. He was the founder and first Chair of NYSBA’s Commercial and Federal Litigation Section and he continues to serve on The Foundation’s Board of Directors. Mr. Haig has served as the Chair of the Committee on the Judiciary of the Association of the Bar of the City of New York and also chaired that Association’s Council on Judicial Administration. 

Mr. Haig is Co-Chair of the Commercial Courts Task Force appointed by Chief Judge Judith S. Kaye to create and refine the Commercial Division of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. He has also been active in efforts to create business courts in many other states and countries.

Mr. Haig has written and lectured extensively on various litigation topics. He is the Editor-in-Chief of an eight volume treatise, entitled Business and Commercial Litigation in Federal Courts, and of a five volume treatise, entitled Commercial Litigation in New York State Courts. He is also the Editor-in-Chief of a four volume treatise, entitled Successful Partnering Between Inside and Outside Counsel.    To give to this fund, click here.
 Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The Robert L. Haig Fund.


Judith S. Kaye headshotThe Judith S. Kaye Youth Court Fund

Provides funding for activities of Youth Courts in New York State.

On January 1, 2009, the Board of Directors of The New York Bar Foundation renamed its Youth Court Fund in honor of retired Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals of the State of New York, Judith S. Kaye. It is only fitting for this fund to now carry the name of Judith S. Kaye, a woman who has spearheaded administrative reform and devoted much of her career to improving the lives of children and families. 

The Youth Court Fund was created in 2008 by The Foundation’s Board of Directors when it determined that New York’s Youth Courts were struggling to survive because of limited financial support and that The Foundation would begin a campaign to raise funds to provide assistance for Youth Court activities.  The purpose of each Youth Court is to seek to improve juvenile justice outcomes through an alternative to the criminal justice system for community youth.  

There are more than 100 Youth Courts in cities, towns and villages in New York that deliver justice to youths between the ages of seven and 15. The purpose of each is to seek to improve juvenile justice outcomes through an alternative to the criminal justice system for community youth. Youth Courts have been emerging as the fastest growing juvenile intervention programs in the country and are patterned after the Family Court process. Girls and boys, who have committed an offense no greater than a misdemeanor, are helped by early intervention and education and learn to appreciate the justice system and the law through a Youth Court experience. Youth Courts hold offenders accountable for negative behavior, and at the same time, teach them to respect themselves along with individuals, families and property in their own communities. Youth Courts are collaborations of local criminal justice agencies, schools and the community and are operated by high school-age youth.

To give to this fund, click here.
 Click restricted fund under the contribution type, then select The Judith S. Kaye Youth Court Fund.


Steven C. Krane headshotThe Steven C. Krane Fund for Student Loan Assistance for the Public Interest
Provides loan assistance to eligible law school graduates in public service work.

The New York Bar Foundation has renamed its Student Loan Assistance for the Public Interest Fund (SLAPI) in memory of former New York State Bar President, Steven C. Krane. A former member of the Foundation’s Board of Directors, Krane unexpectedly passed away in 2010 at the age of 53. He was instrumental in spearheading the initiative, in coordination with the NYSBA Special Committee on Student Loan Assistance for the Public Interest, to establish the Fund. The first SLAPI awards were announced in 2004 

The SLAPI Program was designed to help alleviate the significant debt burden of young attorneys who opt to dedicate their legal talents to public service. To be eligible for the program, candidates must have been admitted to the bar within the past five years and be employed to work at least 35 hours per week in New York State at an organization providing civil, criminal or child welfare/juvenile justice legal services to low-income people; a federal, state or local government agency; or similar organization.


Judge Bernard S. Meyer headshotThe Judge Bernard S. Meyer Scholarship Fund

Provides funding for scholarships to law students attending a law school in New York State who excel in legal writing and advocacy skills.
This fund was established in 2004 by Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein, P.C., to honor Judge Bernard S. Meyer. Judge Meyer, an Associate Judge of the Court of Appeals from May 1979 until December 31, 1986, practiced law with the firm from 1987 until his death on September 3, 2005. Prior to his appointment to the Court of Appeals in 1979 by Governor Hugh Carey, he had been a senior member of the firm. 

At the time of his death, Judge Meyer was co-authoring a history of the Court of Appeals. Part of a two-volume history, The History of the New York Court of Appeals, 1932-2003 was published in 2006. The American Jewish Committee bestowed the Judge Learned Hand Award, its highest honor, on Judge Meyer in June 2003. This prestigious award is presented to outstanding members of the legal profession who exemplify the highest principles for which Judge Hand was renowned. 

Founded in 1960, Meyer, Suozzi, English & Klein, P.C. has five practice locations in Mineola, Melville, New York City, Albany and Washington DC. The firm has a demonstrated commitment to its clients, and to community and public affairs. The firm’s 65 attorneys include former judges and government officials, leaders of the civic and legal communities, and attorneys widely recognized as outstanding practitioners of their profession. 


Miriam Maccoby Netter headshotThe Miriam Maccoby Netter Fellowship, created and funded by the Intellectual Property Law Section

Provides funding for fellowships for students attending a law school in New York State to assist public interest intellectual property organizations or charities with intellectual property law matters.
The fellowship was renamed in July 2010 to honor and recognize Miriam Maccoby Netter for her singular and extraordinary contributions that had brought about the success and growth of the Intellectual Property Law Section of the New York State Bar Association. Ms. Netter was a member of the section's Executive Committee. She passed away in September 2010 after a lengthy illness.

Established in 2008, the fund provides fellowships for students attending a law school in New York State to assist public interest intellectual property organizations or charities in matters relating to intellectual property law. The fellowship program goals are to increase the representation of lawyers in intellectual property law and to provide students with an opportunity to experience intellectual property law practice. The fellow is also invited to be a guest member of the Intellectual Property Law Section and to attend the section’s Executive Committee meetings during the term of the fellowship.

The Intellectual Property Law Section of the New York State Bar Association introduces members of the Association to the interesting and growing areas of law which make up intellectual property law, including patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, licensing and Internet intellectual property law issues. It provides NYSBA certified CLE educational programs, other activities and invites the participation of attorneys, law students and non-lawyer members of the business community.


The Real Property Law Section Melvyn Mitzner Scholarship Fund

Provides funding for scholarships for a second or third-year law student to honor the memory of Melvyn Mitzner, a former Chair of the Section.  The fund has been established by The Foundation through a gift from the Real Property Law Section of the New York State Bar Association (NYSBA) and from Rosalyn Mitzner to honor the memory of Melvyn Mitzner. 

Melvyn Mitzner of New York was named chair of the New York State Bar Association’s (NYSBA) 4,200-member Real Property Law Section in 2001 – 2002 and a legend in the New York Real Estate legal community.  He was the senior vice president and chief underwriting counsel of Commonwealth Land Title Insurance Company, LandAmerica Financial Group, Inc., and Lawyers Title Insurance Corporation, who earned his law degree from Brooklyn Law School.  Melvyn was very active in the section and was a member of its committees on Condominiums and Cooperatives, and Real Estate Financing and Liens. He was a past co-chair of the Committee on Real Estate Taxation—Local and State, and of the Committee on Title and Transfer. He was also a contributing author to the NYSBA publication, Real Estate Titles.  In addition to his NYSBA activities, Mitzner had professional affiliations: the American Bar Association; American College of Real Estate Lawyers; New York State Land Title Association, where he chaired the Legislative Committee; Title Insurance Rate Service Association, Inc., where he chaired the Law and Forms Committee; Westchester County Bar Association, where he chaired the Real Property Law Section; and The Board of Assessment and Review of the City of White Plains, which he chaired. He is a former member of the Rockland County, White Plains and Northern Westchester County bar associations.

At the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, he served on the Committee on Cooperatives and Condominiums and the Real Property Law Committee. He was a sub-chair of the Interest on Interest Legislation Committee; and is a former member of the Housing and Urban Development Committee.

Mitzner published numerous articles in the New York Law Journal and other periodicals. He was a lecturer on real property law topics.



Lorraine Power TharpThe Real Property Law Section Lorraine Power Tharp Scholarship Fund

Provides funding for scholarships for students attending a law school in the State of New York who exemplify the core values important to Ms. Tharp—academic excellence, a demonstrated interest in public service, high integrity and, if possible, an interest in real property law.
The Fund was established in 2010 with a gift from the Real Property Law Section of the New York State Bar Association. The scholarship has been created to honor the memory of former community leader and attorney, Lorraine Power Tharp, who previously served as President of the New York State Bar Association (2002-03) and as Chair of the Real Property Law Section.   

When selecting the scholarship recipient, efforts will be made to honor Ms. Tharp’s commitment to gender equality and diversity in the profession. To ensure geographic diversity, the Foundation will strive to select students attending New York State law schools in different counties each year, so that over time, students from all areas of the state will be able to benefit from the scholarship. A preference will be given to students who demonstrate financial need.  

At the time of her death in 2008, Ms. Tharp was Treasurer of The New York Bar Foundation and had previously served on the Foundation's Board of Directors. She was born in Staten lsland, but grew up in Massena, NY. She graduated from Smith College, after spending her junior year in Geneva, Switzerland at the Institute des Hautes Etudes Internationales, and received her J.D. from Cornell Law School. Ms. Tharp was a partner in the firm of Whiteman Osterman & Hanna LLP, in Albany, and was the Chair of the firm’s real estate practice group. Elected in 1994 to membership in the American College of Real Estate Lawyers, Ms. Tharp was a Fellow of The New York Bar Foundation and the American Bar Foundation. She also was a member of the American Bar Association, where she served as a Delegate to the ABA House of Delegates, and the Albany County and Saratoga County Bar Associations. 


LYC logoThe Law, Youth and Citizenship Fund

The mission of the Law, Youth and Citizenship Program is to facilitate and enrich the civic commitment, and involvement in democracy, of all New Yorkers.

  The Law, Youth and Citizenship Program of the New York State Bar Association has four major goals:

GOAL 1 PROGRAMS -To further the LYC mission through programming such as Mock Trial, We the People: The Citizen and the Constitution, 

GOAL 2 PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT - To provide educators and attorneys with training and resources to teach civics and law to students of all ages.  At little or no cost.

GOAL 3 PUBLICATIONS & RESOURCES - To provide a wide variety of publications and technological resources on topics such as the U.S. Constitution, the Bill of Rights, Supreme Court Decisions, the Justice System, the Legal System, International Law, and Human Rights for pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. 

GOAL 4 AWARDS & GRANTS - To promote and recognize law-related education and citizenship initiatives throughout the state and to further the expansion of such programs.

The award-winning Law, Youth and Citizenship Program is one of the largest civic and law-related education programs in the nation. It is the state administrator of the highly acclaimed national programs We the People: the Citizen and the Constitution. In addition, LYC administers the New York State High School Mock Trial Program, one of the oldest and largest in the nation. LYC conducts professional development opportunities for educators through in-service sessions, workshops, presentations, summer institutes and a statewide conference. LYC developed electronic publications and websites assist teachers in the classroom. LYC assists teachers in celebrating events such as Law Day and Constitution Day. The LYC network has grown to 5,000 teachers and over half-a-million students. The Restricted fund is designed to enable LYC to continue its strong commitment to teachers, students and attorneys. NYSBA has supported the goal of increasing civic engagement of all New Yorkers.


The Trusts and Estates Law Section Fellowship Fund

Provides funding for fellowships for second-year students attending a law school in New York State to work in a trusts and estates position in the public sector.

The fund has been named after the Trusts and Estates Law Section of the New York State Bar Association and was established with a gift from the Section in 2010. The Fellowship Program provides students with an opportunity to experience trusts and estates law practice. The ultimate goal of the Fellowship is to create a network and forge relationships among trusts and estates law attorneys throughout the State of New York.

The Trusts and Estates Law Section is actively involved in all aspects of estate practice, by analyzing topical issues, drafting new legislation and providing relevant continuing legal education to practitioners.